University of Birmingham, UoB, United Kingdom

Scientific contact person: Prof. Joanna Coast
Institute: University of Birmingham, Health Economics Unit 
 

 

Description of the Institute
The Health Economics Unit (HEU) at the University of Birmingham was founded in 1996 following the success of the University in securing a grant from the West Midlands Regional Health Authority to establish a strategic investment in health economics. HEU is part of the School of Health and Population Sciences (HaPS) in the College of Medical and Dental Sciences.  HEU comprises 17 academic staff, 5 academic associates and 2 support posts.
HEu is a longstanding research group in health economics with particular expertise in modelling and economic evaluation with a focus on outcome measurement. In the years since it was established, HEu has developed into a national centre of excellence integrating four areas of activity:

  • A programme of wide-ranging and high quality methodological research;
  • A programme of collaborative empirical research into priority issues for the NHS, covering a wide range of clinical and health service topics;
  • A thriving capacity development programme, training both professional health economists and those working in the NHS as clinicians or managers and providing a full MSc in Health Economics and Health Policy; and
  • A programme of NHS and NIHR support


HEU has a number of highly successful research collaborations with colleagues in other institutions, both nationally and internationally.
Joanna Coast, one of two Professors in HEU, has over 10 years experience working in the area of the economics of antimicrobial resistance and has published extensively in this area. She was a member of the STOA working group on antimicrobial resistance, and together with Richard Smith, is work package leader for the economic aspects of the GRACE study, funded by the EU FP6 programme.

Qualifications and contribution to the project
The Health Economics Unit is well known for its expertise in modelling and economic evaluation and brings particular expertise in the economics of antimicrobial resistance as well as systematic literature review. This is vital for considering the cost-effectiveness of different approaches to optimising use of antibiotics by public campaigns or behavioural interventions. Within the work package, this institution will have primary responsibility for the conduct of the literature review.

Scientific contact person: Prof. Joanna Coast
Institute: University of Birmingham, Health Economics Unit 
 

 

Description of the Institute
The Health Economics Unit (HEU) at the University of Birmingham was founded in 1996 following the success of the University in securing a grant from the West Midlands Regional Health Authority to establish a strategic investment in health economics. HEU is part of the School of Health and Population Sciences (HaPS) in the College of Medical and Dental Sciences.  HEU comprises 17 academic staff, 5 academic associates and 2 support posts.
HEu is a longstanding research group in health economics with particular expertise in modelling and economic evaluation with a focus on outcome measurement. In the years since it was established, HEu has developed into a national centre of excellence integrating four areas of activity:

  • A programme of wide-ranging and high quality methodological research;
  • A programme of collaborative empirical research into priority issues for the NHS, covering a wide range of clinical and health service topics;
  • A thriving capacity development programme, training both professional health economists and those working in the NHS as clinicians or managers and providing a full MSc in Health Economics and Health Policy; and
  • A programme of NHS and NIHR support


HEU has a number of highly successful research collaborations with colleagues in other institutions, both nationally and internationally.
Joanna Coast, one of two Professors in HEU, has over 10 years experience working in the area of the economics of antimicrobial resistance and has published extensively in this area. She was a member of the STOA working group on antimicrobial resistance, and together with Richard Smith, is work package leader for the economic aspects of the GRACE study, funded by the EU FP6 programme.

Qualifications and contribution to the project
The Health Economics Unit is well known for its expertise in modelling and economic evaluation and brings particular expertise in the economics of antimicrobial resistance as well as systematic literature review. This is vital for considering the cost-effectiveness of different approaches to optimising use of antibiotics by public campaigns or behavioural interventions. Within the work package, this institution will have primary responsibility for the conduct of the literature review.

 

University of Birmingham