Université de Genève, UNIGE, Switzerland

Scientific contact person: Prof. Stephan Harbarth
Institute: Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Service Prévention et Contrôle de l'Infection
 


Description of the Institute

The University of Geneva Hospitals (UNIGE), Geneva, Switzerland, is a 2,200-bed health care center providing primary and tertiary care for Geneva and the surrounding areas. It hosts a well-known infection program that has generated ground-breaking articles in the field of antibiotic resistance, hand hygiene and general infection control issues.

Qualifications and contribution to the project
Prof. Stephan Harbarth (MD, MS) is the scientist in charge of the supervision of WP3. He is a well-known infectious disease epidemiologist with extensive research experience in the field of antimicrobial use and resistance. In the past, he has devoted substantial efforts toward control of resistance through improved antibiotic use and diagnostic tests. He was recipient of the Holtzer-Scholarship from Harvard University for postgraduate studies at Harvard School of Public Health in 1998-99 (M.S. in Epidemiology), recipient of the Young Investigator Awards by the Swiss Society of Infectious Diseases, the American Society of Microbiology and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases for research excellence and scientific promise.  He is currently associate hospital epidemiologist, board-certified attending physician in infectious diseases and associate Professor, with more than 100 original articles in peer-reviewed journals as 1st, 2nd or last author. Serves as expert to WHO and other governmental agencies. His current research interests include the the pharmacoepidemiology of antimicrobial agents and antibiotic overuse, international analyses of macro-level determinants of antibiotic use and resistance rates (Lancet Infect Dis 2001; Emerg Infect Dis 2002 & 2004 & 2005); and the molecular epidemiology of emerging pathogens such as community-acquired MRSA (Emerg Infect Dis 2005).  Recently, he has published a perspective paper on the future of antibiotic resistance, detailing the potential impact of public campaigns and regulatory measures on future trends in antibiotic use and resistance (Lancet Infect Dis 2010).

Scientific contact person: Prof. Stephan Harbarth
Institute: Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Service Prévention et Contrôle de l'Infection
 


Description of the Institute

The University of Geneva Hospitals (UNIGE), Geneva, Switzerland, is a 2,200-bed health care center providing primary and tertiary care for Geneva and the surrounding areas. It hosts a well-known infection program that has generated ground-breaking articles in the field of antibiotic resistance, hand hygiene and general infection control issues.

Qualifications and contribution to the project
Prof. Stephan Harbarth (MD, MS) is the scientist in charge of the supervision of WP3. He is a well-known infectious disease epidemiologist with extensive research experience in the field of antimicrobial use and resistance. In the past, he has devoted substantial efforts toward control of resistance through improved antibiotic use and diagnostic tests. He was recipient of the Holtzer-Scholarship from Harvard University for postgraduate studies at Harvard School of Public Health in 1998-99 (M.S. in Epidemiology), recipient of the Young Investigator Awards by the Swiss Society of Infectious Diseases, the American Society of Microbiology and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases for research excellence and scientific promise.  He is currently associate hospital epidemiologist, board-certified attending physician in infectious diseases and associate Professor, with more than 100 original articles in peer-reviewed journals as 1st, 2nd or last author. Serves as expert to WHO and other governmental agencies. His current research interests include the the pharmacoepidemiology of antimicrobial agents and antibiotic overuse, international analyses of macro-level determinants of antibiotic use and resistance rates (Lancet Infect Dis 2001; Emerg Infect Dis 2002 & 2004 & 2005); and the molecular epidemiology of emerging pathogens such as community-acquired MRSA (Emerg Infect Dis 2005).  Recently, he has published a perspective paper on the future of antibiotic resistance, detailing the potential impact of public campaigns and regulatory measures on future trends in antibiotic use and resistance (Lancet Infect Dis 2010).

Team University of Geneva